truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: glass cat)
[first published on Storytellers Unplugged, February 7, 2009; dug out of the Wayback Machine by an awesome reader]
click! )
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: felix in china)
My intrepid translator, [livejournal.com profile] 214314, sent me pictures today of the Chinese editions of the Doctrine of Labyrinths.

covers! )

map! )

MERE CAPSLOCK CANNOT CONVEY THE DEPTH AND BREADTH OF MY EXCITEMENT.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (cats: napping)
Here's what's left:
  • 1 copy of A Companion to Wolves (paperback), $7 ea.
  • 2 copies of Corambis (hardback), $30 ea.


Please comment on the sale post to purchase.



And you can still buy Unnatural Creatures until midnight.



Also, I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who has participated so far. I'm lousy at math, but it looks like we'll easily have a $2,000 donation for the Companion Animal Fund by the end of the sale. And that's just EXCELLENT.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (cats: napping)
REMEMBER: to buy an item, comment on this post. I will reply, letting you know the item is yours. AT THAT TIME AND NOT BEFORE, hit the PayPal button.

MISCELLANEOUS
  • 1 copy of Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900 42.1 (Winter 2002), which contains my sole academic article, "Speaking and Silent Women in Upon Appleton House": $5
  • 1 copy of Concussed, from Concussion (Eastercon 2006), which includes stuff from a whole bunch of cool people--M. John Harrison, Hal Duncan, Elizabeth Hand, Jay Lake, Jo Walton, Elizabeth Wein, etc.--and "Toward a Praxis of World-Building," which is a reprint of a couple blog posts of mine: $5

  • 1 copy of Paradox: The Magazine of Historical and Speculative Fiction 10 (Winter 2006-2007), containing my novelette "Amante Dorée," about a transsexual prostitute/spy in an AU New Orleans: $5
  • 1 copy of The Queen in Winter (New York: Berkley Books, 2006)--fantasy/romance anthology with stories from Claire Delacroix, Lynn Kurland, Sharon Shinn, and me (my story, A Gift of Wings, is set in Meduse, although it has no other connection with the Doctrine of Labyrinths): $20

KYLE MURCHISON BOOTH
  • 1 copy of Lovecraft's Weird Mysteries #7 (first publication of "The Inheritance of Barnabas Wilcox"): $5
  • 1 copy of All Hallows 35 (February 2004) (first publication of "Bringing Helena Back"): $10
  • 1 copy of All Hallows 41 (February 2006) (first publication of "Drowning Palmer"): $10
  • 10 copies of the first edition of The Bone Key (you should know, if you're thinking of buying it, that The Bone Key is going to be rereleased later this year, with story notes, a new introduction, and a new cover): $15 per copy

A COMPANION TO WOLVES
  • 5 copies of A Companion to Wolves (hardback): $25 per copy
  • 5 1 copy of A Companion to Wolves (paperback): $7 per copy

THE DOCTRINE OF LABYRINTHS
  • 10 sets of the Doctrine of Labyrinths in paperback: $35 per set
  • 2 copies of Mélusine (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 3 copies of The Virtu (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 2 copies of The Mirador (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 3 2 copies of Corambis (hardback): $30 per copy


If you want to donate to the Companion Animal Fund, here is your button. This is also the button to use for payments, after I have confirmed that the item is yours.

[sale over; button removed]
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: melusine (Judy York))
This is the auction post for a signed hardback set of the Doctrine of Labyrinths (Mélusine, The Virtu, The Mirador, Corambis). The first bidder comments on this post with his/her bid; the second bidder replies to the first bidder's comment with his/her bid. Third bidder replies to second bidder. And so on.

This auction will run until midnight CST, February 3.

Do I hear $100?
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (cats: napping)
THIS IS NOT THE SALE POST. YOU CANNOT BUY THINGS FROM HERE.



The Ben Jonson Memorial Fundraiser will take place on February 2, 2011 (Ben's birthday). All proceeds will go to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital's Companion Animal Fund.

Please spread the word!

I will be selling:

MISCELLANEOUS
  • 1 copy of Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900 42.1 (Winter 2002), which contains my sole academic article, "Speaking and Silent Women in Upon Appleton House": $5
  • 1 copy of Concussed, from Concussion (Eastercon 2006), which includes stuff from a whole bunch of cool people--M. John Harrison, Hal Duncan, Elizabeth Hand, Jay Lake, Jo Walton, Elizabeth Wein, etc.--and "Toward a Praxis of World-Building," which is a reprint of a couple blog posts of mine: $5
  • 1 copy of Paradox: The Magazine of Historical and Speculative Fiction 10 (Winter 2006-2007), containing my novelette "Amante Dorée," about a transsexual prostitute/spy in an AU New Orleans: $5
  • 1 copy of The Queen in Winter (New York: Berkley Books, 2006)--fantasy/romance anthology with stories from Claire Delacroix, Lynn Kurland, Sharon Shinn, and me (my story, A Gift of Wings, is set in Meduse*, although it has no other connection with the Doctrine of Labyrinths): $20

KYLE MURCHISON BOOTH
  • 1 copy of Lovecraft's Weird Mysteries #7 (first publication of "The Inheritance of Barnabas Wilcox"): $5
  • 1 copy of All Hallows 35 (February 2004) (first publication of "Bringing Helena Back"): $10
  • 1 copy of All Hallows 41 (February 2006) (first publication of "Drowning Palmer"): $10
  • 10 copies of the first edition of The Bone Key (you should know, if you're thinking of buying it, that The Bone Key is going to be rereleased later this year, with story notes, a new introduction, and a new cover): $15 per copy

I also want to do a limited edition chapbook of the four uncollected Booth stories: "The Replacement," "The World Without Sleep," "White Charles," "The Yellow Dressing Gown." Working title is Unnatural Creatures. Price will be $20, although in this one instance, not ALL proceeds will go to the Companion Animal Fund, as some will have to go to production costs. But I will not take a cut.

By "limited edition," I mean a print run of 50. If you would be interested, please comment here, so that I can make a guess as to whether it's worth doing. And if more than 50 people indicate interest, I will consider making it a print run of 100 instead. Unnatural Creatures will be on sale from 02/02 2:00 P.M. CST to 02/03 2:00 P.M. CST. This will be a "speak now or forever hold your peace" kind of deal.

A COMPANION TO WOLVES
  • 5 copies of A Companion to Wolves (hardback): $25 per copy
  • 5 copies of A Companion to Wolves (paperback): $7 per copy

THE DOCTRINE OF LABYRINTHS
  • 10 sets of the Doctrine of Labyrinths in paperback: $35 per set
  • 2 copies of Mélusine (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 3 copies of The Virtu (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 2 copies of The Mirador (hardback): $30 per copy
  • 3 copies of Corambis (hardback): $30 per copy


And I will auction off my last set of the Doctrine of Labyrinths in hardback. Starting bid will be $100.

All items will be signed. They will be personalized at the discretion of the buyer. I will ship anywhere in the world.

The sale and auction will start on February 2, 2011, at two o'clock P.M. Central Standard Time. The auction will run until two o'clock P.M. CST, February 3, 2011. The sale will run until either everything's gone or it's obvious people are done buying. All payments will be made via PayPal, and there will also be a button for those who don't want or can't afford to buy anything, but who would still like to make a donation.

Have I forgotten anything? Have a question? Please leave a comment!

---
*Meduse is my name for the world of the Doctrine of Labyrinths.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: melusine (Judy York))
[livejournal.com profile] roisindubh211 is moving, and for the logical reasons is looking to sell some books. Specifically in this case, Mélusine and The Virtu in paperback (Good condition) and The Mirador and Corambis in hardcover (Very Good condition). If you're interested, please contact [livejournal.com profile] roisindubh211--NOT ME, since all I know is what I've just written.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
1. The eclipse tonight, in my tiny part of the world, will be eclipsed by snow.

2. I have accomplished Things today. Things, I tell you! Several of them Things that have needed accomplishing since sometime in August.

3. One of those Things was turning a rejected story right back out the door (no, don't take your boots off, you're not staying), and throwing another story into the eel-infested waters ring. I've got to finish editing "The Devil in Gaylord's Creek" and "To Die for Moonlight" so I can launch them out of the nest, too. And possibly unmix my metaphors, while I'm at it.

4. The winter solstice is the birthday of the protagonist of The Goblin Emperor. It's weird; I worked out Felix and Mildmay's birthdays, but I never remember when they are; I don't have the least idea when Booth's birthday is. But Maia's birthday, I remember.

5. [livejournal.com profile] matociquala observed (over on Twitter where she is, of course, @matociquala), that this is the first time there's been a total lunar eclipse on the winter solstice since 1638. There's a time travel story in there somewhere. I can feel it.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
1. Happy birthday (yesterday) to [livejournal.com profile] coffeeem and to [livejournal.com profile] matociquala's Giant Ridiculous Dog!

2. My second Ellery Queen post is up at tor-dot-com, here.

3. Yesterday, [livejournal.com profile] heresluck and I braved the winterness of Wisconsin to go bookstore trolling. I picked up [livejournal.com profile] cmpriest's Boneshaker and Dreadnought to give as xmas gifts (having given h.l. our extra copy of Boneshaker--I am flinging the steampunk zombies far and wide this holiday season), and had excellent book-fu on my own account:
  • Cohen, Patricia Cline. The Murder of Helen Jewett: The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York (I'm hoping this will be more the book I wanted The Mysterious Death of Mary Rogers to be).
  • Godbeer, Richard. The Devil's Dominion: Magic and Religion in Early New England.
  • Kater, Michael H. Hitler Youth.
  • Sigmund, Anna Maria. Women of the Third Reich (not quite as exciting as if I'd found Jill Stephenson's Women in Nazi Germany, but still).

4. There's even more winter over in Minnesota.

5. When I was buying Boneshaker and Dreadnought, the owner of A Room of One's Own did a double-take at my check and said, "Are you Sarah Monette the science fiction writer?" And when I agreed that I was, she said, "Are they going to put your books out again? Because I get a lot of people asking about them." And I told her about the rights and my plan to find a small press, and she mentioned the TOTALLY INSANE prices The Virtu is going for on eBay, and so on.

I've had conversations like that with booksellers before, but they've always been in-genre (Dreamhaven, Larry Smith, etc.). So having the conversation again with someone who sells all kinds of books feels like, in the middle of a lot of discouragement about my career, a kind of encouraging milestone.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: virtu (Judy York))
So remember a while back, I said I had an awesome piece of bad news?

I can tell you about it now.

The bad news is, Mélusine and The Virtu are out of print.

The AWESOME news is, Ace has officially returned the rights to me.

Which means I can finally finally finally do something about getting them BACK in print.

Plan A is to find a small press that would be interested in publishing them, either separately or in an omnibus edition. (Although there is the whole second half of the series, I think the first two books actually stand together very nicely, so it's not as crazy as it sounds.)

If that fails, Plan B is to self-publish them, through lulu.com or some such POD service, so that at least people who want to read them can get ahold of them. Yes, obviously, I would vastly prefer it if there were a way for these books to continue to contribute to (a.) my career and (b.) my income, which is why we're going with Plan A first, but if Plan A fails, I'm not going to sit on them like a dragon with a very small hoard, but will find a way to make them available.

In any event, I've been frustrated and unhappy about the situation, particularly wrt The Virtu, for a long time, and I am extremely happy that I finally have the ability to do something constructive about it.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
I'm keeping a mental list of things about this broken ankle that don't match up with broken bones in fiction. I already wrote about the sound of my ankle breaking, but here are a couple others:

1. if your crutches are adjusted properly and you're using them properly, they will not make your armpits hurt. They won't even touch your armpits. On the other hand, they will give you calluses on the heels of your palms.

2. maybe this is because of the surgery, or maybe it's because I'm a wuss, but it's been a month, and I still have no fucking stamina. Taking a bath exhausts me. I can hobble the length of the block, but then I have to lie down and pant. I'm still sleeping ridiculous amounts, and I have neither any ambition, nor the concentration to do anything about it if I did. I actually accomplished some work today (a second draft on an essay owed to a lovely person who knows who s/he is), and I'm hoping to be able to tackle The Tempering of Men (a.k.a. the sequel to A Companion to Wolves) this week, even if I can only manage it two pages at a time.

3. On the other hand, the itching? That part's true.

I am wildly grateful that I started this quilting project just before I broke my ankle, and equally wildly grateful to the kind and awesome ladies at the local quilt shop, who ironed and pin-basted it for me, because quilting around Kliban cats is pretty much the ideal activity for me right now, interspersed with playing Diablo II (again) and rereading Golden Age mysteries. I started with John Dickson Carr and have moved onto Ellery Queen.

(As a side note, I'm currently rereading The Siamese Twin Mystery, which inspired me to find wikipedia's entry on conjoined twins. I was particularly fascinated by Lakshmi Tatma, who was born in 2005 with four arms and four legs--conjoined to a parasitic headless twin (x-ray, if you're having trouble visualizing)--and was worshipped in her native village as an incarnation of the goddess Lakshmi. The surgery to separate her from her parasitic twin when she was two was successful and quite complicated (follow the links from the wikipedia article if you're interested), and she survived. I hope she's still doing well.)

And somebody commented with some questions about the Doctrine of Labyrinths, which I am happy to answer:

Q: I'd like to know more about the obligation de sang - is it a baby step toward the obligation d'ame, or something distinct?

A: The obligation de sang is cast on wizards; the obligation d'âme is cast on annemer. They have similar effects, but, no, they're not the same thing.

Q: And I'd like to know more about Cardenio - how he and Mildmay became friends, particularly, and whether my reading of him as (1) clearly in love with Mildmay and (b) asexual is correct.

A: I don't know how Mildmay met Cardenio. The friendship emerged in my head full-grown, as it were, with no backstory.

Cardenio definitely has a crush on Mildmay--"love" is a tricky word, and I hesitate to use it--and I don't know about his sexuality. He is very shy and very reserved, and he hasn't told me.

Q: My sense is that Mildmay mostly disappeared for the bulk of Corambis - that the last book, more than any of the others, was weighted heavily toward Felix, and his growth as a character - specifically, for himself and for his brother. Were you trying to get Felix to the place Mildmay already was (or at least seemed to be), where he could see his brother as a person? Or am I misreading?

A: I wouldn't say that Mildmay disappeared--he is, after all, still a narrator, and his character arc in Corambis is important--but I will say that I conceived of The Mirador as Mildmay's katabasis and Corambis as Felix's. Katabasis is the descent to the underworld and return which Joseph Campbell describes as part of the Hero's Journey--I'm not entirely sold on Campbell, but with the particular psychology of my two particular narrators, they both had to go through their own personal metaphorical hells in order to come to terms with their pasts and their damage and emerge on the other side as functional, compassionate adults. (Which is also not to say that I think either of them is "fixed" or "healed"--they still have to live with their scars, both physical and emotional, and there are going to be bad days and backsliding--but I think by the end of the series they are better, both in the sense of psychologically healthier and in the sense of being able and willing to care about each other (and by extension, other people like Kay and Corbie) than they were at the beginning.)

At least, that's what I was trying for.

So, yes, to use a semi-accurate shorthand, Mildmay "grew up" in The Mirador and therefore there was less that needed to happen to him in Corambis, in terms of his psychomachia, than there was for Felix.

5 things

Jun. 12th, 2010 07:14 pm
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (cats: nom de plume)
1. Went to the vet's office this morning to buy cat food and got to see a Newfoundland heading into one of the exam rooms for his or her check up. I love Newfies; they look so exactly like small bears, and those that I have seen have clearly been deep in love with the whole wide world.

2. My dreams last night starred Avery Brooks and Hulk Hogan. I'm still decidedly nonplussed about that.

3. I now know of two cats named Mildmay (thank you, [livejournal.com profile] hominysnark and [livejournal.com profile] topknot, both for choosing that name and for telling me about it). Of all the things I imagined before I became a writer about what a writing career would be like, I never thought people would be naming their cats after my characters. I have to say, it's kind of awesome.

4. No, neither Felix nor Mehitabel is named after the famous cats of those names--although Mehitabel is more or less named after a cat, as my first exposure to the name was a neighbor's cat when I was a kid (and that cat may have been named after Don Marquis' mehitabel, although I don't know for sure either way). That wasn't in my head when I was naming her though; all I was after was to replace her original name, which was Hephzibah.

5. Today, in pursuit of my job, I found both an Old Norse dictionary (ON to English and English to ON) and some Old English resources. The word for "poison" in Old Norse is eitr, and the word for "poisonous" in Old English is aettryne. (The word "poison" is from Latin, potio, -onis by way of Old French and Middle English pocion.)

Best job in the world.

Reminder

May. 22nd, 2010 05:33 pm
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
The [livejournal.com profile] debsliverlovers auctions end tomorrow (May 23rd) at noon EDT. I've donated a signed paperback set of the Doctrine of Labyrinths, and there are many other fabulous items as well. I'm drooling over the Thomas Canty art, myself.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
Over at [livejournal.com profile] debsliverlovers, I have put a complete paperback set of the Doctrine of Labyrinths up for auction. If you haven't had this cross your path yet, [livejournal.com profile] debsliverlovers is a fandom auction raising funds for Deb Mensinger (wife of Laurie J. Marks), who needs a liver transplant (live donor lined up, but he has no insurance and lives on the wrong coast--the community profile has the full details). There are lots of other REALLY COOL items in the auction, so I encourage you to check it out.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: melusine (Judy York))
I should probably mention that Corambis is out in paperback. Official release date, according to Amazon (which knows these things) was March 30, and an alert reader has testified that in this instance free market capitalism is working.



While I'm on the subject of the Doctrine of Labyrinths and publication, an update for everyone who is wondering: I am still trying to get The Virtu back in print. My agent has made the formal request to Ace Books either to reprint it or return the rights to me, and we are (still) waiting for Ace's response. Publishing works by Newtonian physics: an object at rest tends to remain at rest.

Yes (in case you were wondering about this, too), the waiting is DRIVING ME UP THE WALL. I badly want this book to be available again before Ace decides to take The Mirador and Corambis out of print (not to mention Mélusine), and I hate the inexorably vicious circle I can feel lurking somewhere over the horizon, wherein people don't buy books 3 and 4 because they can't get book 2 (because book 2 was out of print before book 4 was published), and therefore Ace not only feels justified in having taken book 2 out of print (because the numbers on books 3 and 4 are terrible--obviously we made the right decision about book 2), but also uses that as justification to take books 3 and 4 out of print as well. And there I am, with a series I love and am deeply proud of, which becomes unavailable, and therefore unread. And therefore forgotten. The thought makes me want to sit down in the middle of the floor and howl.

And there's nothing I can do about any of it except what I am doing. Which is sit and wait and gnaw my fingernails back to the elbow.

And, I think, go outside and take out some of this frustrated aggression on the weeds. [ETA: "Rain," said Eeyore. "I expected as much."]
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)

Support rape crisis centers and enter to win an Advance Copy of Red Hood’s Revenge, by Jim C. Hines.



The most excellent Jim C. Hines is doing a not-a-raffle to support rape crisis centers.



I've found something that puzzles me utterly about Tefertiller's Earp biography. Both Roberts and Barra (Inventing Wyatt Earp: His Life and Many Legends, which I'm reading right now) remark on the fact that Sadie Marcus was Jewish--in a well-known-historical-fact way, not in a whoa-researchers-have recently-discovered way--and since I learn from Barra that Wyatt is buried with Sadie in a Jewish cemetery in Colma, California*, it seems like something a biography of Wyatt ought at least to name-check. But Tefertiller (whom Barra describes as having "put together the most complete picture to date of the strange, lifelong match between two adventurers of vastly different backgrounds" (Barra 15)) doesn't mention that fact anywhere. Given how clearly Tefertiller's dislike of Sadie shows through, I'm wondering if it's some sort of weird reverse-anti-Semitism: not tainting Judaism by association with her. But really, I'm just baffled.



*Google Maps (see link above) shows that Colma, California, is nothing BUT cemeteries, which led me to check the Wikipedia entry; Colma was founded as a necropolis in 1924: "the dead population outnumber the living by thousands to one."



Since my box of Corambis paperbacks arrived while I was in Tucson, I spent part of the afternoon organizing my inventory of author's copies (and will spend another part of the afternoon organizing some of the books in the house I didn't write); I have fourteen sets of the paperbacks of the Doctrine of Labyrinths. My plan has always been to donate them, and I would be grateful for suggestions of libraries, programs, or other worthy places/causes for which they would be good donations. (I don't guarantee, of course, that I will follow any given suggestion.)



First thunderstorm of the year this afternoon, although it was clearly in a hurry to be somewhere else.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
Megan Arkenberg and [livejournal.com profile] cheloya, things for you are In The Mail.

The [livejournal.com profile] con_or_bust auctions close Saturday, March 13, 2010 (11:59 p.m. Eastern). This includes (among a lot of other cool stuff) the auction for a signed hardback of The Virtu, in which the bidding has reached $65.

Corambis will be out in paperback (according to Amazon) at the end of this month.

Tomorrow, I'm doing a Friends of the NIU Libraries/Friends of DeKalb Public Library event. Info here. Also, yes, I will sign things after the discussion, and yes, I will sign things other than The Bone Key.

Sunday, I'm leaving for a week in Arizona with [livejournal.com profile] matociquala, [livejournal.com profile] cristalia, [livejournal.com profile] stillsostrange, [livejournal.com profile] coffeeem, and [livejournal.com profile] willshetterly, which culminates in a Shadow Unit panel at the Tucson Festival of Books. I believe we're also doing a signing at the Mysterious Galaxy booth.

Other planned appearances for 2010 include:


There's probably something else, but I forget what it is.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (writing: virtu (Judy York))
ONE! The auctions for [livejournal.com profile] hominysnark (who, I have learned, named one of her cats Mildmay, hence the icon) are in their final twenty-four hours, and the bidding has reached:
  • The Bone Key and 4 mss (plus a fifth when it ceases to be vaporware): 110 $125 $130 $160
  • 3-book set, Mélusine, The Virtu, The Mirador: $170 $200 $250 and a suggestion that both top bidders be allowed to win, which I am pondering.
  • Mélusine: $60 $75
  • The Virtu: $50 $60
  • The Mirador: $40 $45


That's $420 $435 $465 $475 $480 $485 $500 $550 $580 thus far. I said that if we reached $1,000 I'd do a serial podcast of The Virtu. Now I picked that number deliberately to be out of reach unless something amazing happened, because OMG that's a lot of work, but I have another offer: if we reach $500 total, I will do a free podcast, or podcasts, of up to 10,000 words of my published short fiction, stories to be chosen by you all via LJ poll.

ETA: We're past $500. Yay! After the auctions close (i.e., in about forty minutes), I will put up the poll.



TWO! In other auction news, the bidding in the [livejournal.com profile] helptheproject auction for all four DoL hardbacks is at $100 $200 $250 $300.



THREE! My Storytellers Unplugged column for February is about endings: "Both The Great Detective Explains It All ending and the Mawwiage Is What Bwings Us Togethah Today ending are artificial in the extreme, and frequently–as Elizabeth Bear pointed out when I mentioned it to her–awkward, obtrusive, and unsatisfying, but the thing is, I understand why people do them. Because it gets everybody to hold still for FIVE FUCKING SECONDS so you can END THE GODDAMN BOOK ALREADY. And I don’t care if your eyes WERE closed, Aunt Mabel, this is the picture that’s going to the newspaper."



FOUR! [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna speaks for every woman who has ever bought deodorant.



FIVE! FIVE BEAUTIFUL POINTERS! In case somebody else out there needs these as badly as I did, videos of dancing hexapods.
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
"[livejournal.com profile] helptheproject is a fandom auction to benefit the Virginia Avenue Project, a free afterschool arts and academics program. 100% of participating children graduate from high school. 95% go on to college. 98% are the first person in their family to go.

"Due to budget cuts, unless we can raise $15,000 by mid-March, we will lose our centerpiece program, the One-on-Ones. In this program, professional actor/writers write a short play to act in with the kid they're paired with, rehearse it with them in a beautiful countryside summer camp, and then return to Los Angeles to put on a show. This program has been running continuously for 20 years - let's not lose it now!"



I am donating a signed set of the Doctrine of Labyrinths hardbacks (Mélusine, The Virtu, The Mirador, Corambis) to the auction, and there's all kinds of other cool stuff already also (be a pirate in [livejournal.com profile] oracne's next book!).

If you want to bid on the DoL offer, use this link.

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truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
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